CSPs: Representative sequences of wood-inhabiting fungi in highly diverse subtropical forests, all CSPs

Usage Rights

This data is Private.

We thank the administration of the Gutianshan National Nature Reserve for granting research permissions. Bernhard Schmid, Keping Ma, Xiaojuan Liu, Yang Bo, Chen Lin and the entire team of BEF-China are gratefully acknowledged for their support.

Dataset Abstract

The deadwood mycobiome, also known as wood-inhabiting fungi (WIF), are among the key players in wood decomposition, having a large impact on nutrient cycling in forest soils. However, our knowledge of WIF richness and distribution patterns in different forest biomes is limited. Here, we used pyrotag sequencing of the fungal internal transcribed spacer (ITS2) region to characterize the deadwood mycobiome of two tree species with greatly different wood characteristics (Schima superba and Pinus massoniana) in a Chinese subtropical forest ecosystem. Specifically, we tested (i) the effects of tree species and wood quality properties on WIF OTU richness and community composition; (ii) the role of biotic and abiotic factors in shaping the WIF communities; and (iii) the relationship between WIF OTU richness, community composition and decomposition rates. Due to different wood chemical properties, we hypothesized that the WIF communities derived from the two tree species would be correlated differently with biotic and abiotic factors.
Our results show that deadwood in subtropical forests harbors diverse fungal communities comprising seven ecological functional groups. We found interesting colonization patterns for this subtropical biome, where Resinicium spp. were highly detected in both broadleaved and coniferous deadwood. In addition, the members of Xylariales were frequently found in Schima. The two deadwood species differed significantly in WIF OTU richness (Pinus > Schima) and community composition (P < 0.001). Variations in WIF community composition of both tree species were significantly explained by wood pH and ecological factors (biotic: deadwood species, basal area and abiotic: soil pH), but the WIF communities derived from each tree species correlated differently with abiotic factors. Interestingly, we found that deadwood decomposition rate significantly correlated with WIF communities and negatively correlated with WIF OTU richness in both tree species. We conclude that the pattern of WIF OTU richness and community composition are controlled by multiple interacting biotic and abiotic factors. Overall, our study provides an in-depth picture of the deadwood mycobiome in this subtropical forest. Furthermore, by comparing our results to results from temperate and boreal forests we contribute to a better understanding of patterns of WIF communities across different biomes and geographic locations.

Dataset Design

Here, we used pyrotag sequencing of the fungal internal transcribed spacer (ITS2) region to characterize the deadwood mycobiome of two tree species with greatly different wood characteristics (Schima superba and Pinus massoniana) in a Chinese subtropical forest ecosystem. All CSPs are included.

Spatial Extent

The Gutianshan National Nature Reserve, all CSP

Temporal Extent

2 years

Taxonomic Extent

Wood-inhabiting fungi

Data Analysis

Representative sequences of all fungi

Data columns available in the raw data part of this dataset

>I06DPDB03FVDAR
>I06DPDB03FVDAR
Data group: Not specified
Alert Sample values are not displayed because this column hasn't been approved yet.